That’s what community surveys show to be the recognition by Americans that good oral health is essential for overall health — as reported by the Delta Dental Institute.

This poster in the waiting room of a Toronto family medical practice was well received by diabetic adults. 9 in 10 positively responded to recommendations for more preventive oral healthcare when needed.

So if there is this consensus, why don’t Canadian insurance companies, benefit advisors and Canadian Ministers of Health embrace the integration of preventive oral healthcare into the medical services delivered to diabetics, adults with chronic wheezing, those with cardiovascular disease, and those with growing signs of confusion?

It’s easy to say “because”. Its much harder to say “this is how it is done” and to show the savings from integrating preventive services in the mouth to preventive care for the body.

CHX has started down the harder road to show how quickly integration can happen, how much support there is from high risk groups such as diabetics, and what the health economics are for improving oral health on overall medical spending. The curiosity is not that we are doing this, it is that we seem to be alone.

In fact, the 9 in 10 ratio is just what we found when recommending Prevora to diabetic adults with chronic oral inflammation. 9 in 10 said yes. This overwhelming support makes integration that much easier.