Poor oral health & chronic kidney disease

Judging from American data, about 25% of Canadian healthcare spending for seniors is to manage chronic kidney disease. It is perhaps the top burden on our hospitals. Moreover, the pandemic is making it worse. Between 20% and 40% of COVID-19 patients in the ICU sustain kidney damage. Many patients on dialysis only start this treatment…

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Stroke and oral inflammation

Chronic oral inflammation (gingivitis and periodontal disease) is a well-known risk contributor to stroke. But are periodontal surgery and scaling effective in reducing the risks of stroke? A new, very large retrospective study of middle-age Koreans with oral inflammation indicates these procedures are helpful in reducing stroke. Data from Korean medical insurance claims show that…

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Root canals and atherosclerosis

Recently, a friend told me he had taken a half day off work to have a root canal procedure. He explained it was related to lots of cavities in childhood. It seems the tooth cracked and the filling material damaged the tooth root. Mechanical damage to the tooth root is one theory. A more likely…

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Thinking about dementia

A recent survey of Americans age 50 to 64, conducted by the University of Michigan reports 37% have been touched within their families by dementia. Almost half of respondents thought they would develop dementia in their lifetimes.

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Relevant oral healthcare

A recent report in Forbes is disturbing. Widespread hunger in our aging Boomers. Already half of older Americans are malnourished or at risk of bein malnourished.

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Stroke & oral health

Since 2016, we have known that a type of oral bacteria, Streptococcus mutans, is directly linked to cerebral micro-bleeds, a precursor to a stroke.

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Dental decay — an important inflammation

A recent study reported in the Journal of the American Medical Association concluded that “oral infections in childhood appear to be associated with the sub-clinical carotid atherosclerosis seen in adulthood.” The data are compelling. The presence of any sign of oral infection in childhood was associated with increased atherosclerosis by almost twofold, independent of normal…

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Oral inflammation = systemic inflammation

A new study in The Lancet reports a significant reduction in inflammatory markers in the blood after intensive non-surgical periodontal treatment (NSPT). Have a look at the above chart.

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